Menu Close

Clinical evaluations notes for Ragweed pollen, Timothy Grass Pollen & Birch Pollen. The following allergens: mouse allergens, dust mite allergens, roach allergens, cat allergens and dog allergens, and beta glucan. 

  1. Ragweed Pollen, Timothy Grass Pollen & Birch Pollen: Clinical evaluations for these pollen allergens are typically conducted to assess a person’s sensitivity or allergic response to these specific types of pollen. The evaluations may include:
  • Skin Prick Test: A small amount of allergen extract, such as ragweed, timothy grass, or birch pollen, is placed on the skin, usually on the forearm or back. The skin is then pricked or scratched to allow the allergen to enter the skin. If a person is allergic, they may develop a localized allergic reaction, such as redness, swelling, or itching at the test site.
  • Blood Test: A blood sample is taken to measure the levels of specific antibodies called immunoglobulin E (IgE) that are produced in response to the allergen. Elevated levels of IgE antibodies to ragweed, timothy grass, or birch pollen can indicate sensitization or allergy.
  • Symptom Assessment: A clinical evaluation also involves assessing a person’s symptoms and medical history. A doctor will inquire about symptoms such as sneezing, runny nose, nasal congestion, itchy or watery eyes, and other allergic symptoms that occur during the respective pollen seasons.
  1. Mouse Allergens, Dust Mite Allergens, Roach Allergens, Cat Allergens, and Dog Allergens: Clinical evaluations for these allergens are conducted to determine an individual’s allergic sensitization and the potential impact on their respiratory health. The evaluations may include:
  • Skin Prick Test: Similar to pollen allergens, a skin prick test can be performed using extracts of mouse, dust mite, roach, cat, or dog allergens. The skin is pricked or scratched with the allergen, and any resulting allergic reaction is observed.
  • Blood Test: Blood tests, such as specific IgE blood tests, can measure the levels of allergen-specific antibodies (IgE) in the blood. Elevated levels of specific IgE antibodies to mouse, dust mite, roach, cat, or dog allergens can indicate sensitization or allergy.
  • Symptom Assessment: A doctor will assess a person’s symptoms and medical history, particularly respiratory symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, nasal congestion, sneezing, and itchy or watery eyes that may be associated with exposure to these allergens.
  1. Beta Glucan: Beta glucan is a component found in the cell walls of certain fungi, including some types of molds. Clinical evaluations related to beta glucan exposure typically focus on assessing the potential respiratory health effects. These evaluations may include:
  • Respiratory Symptom Assessment: Doctors will inquire about respiratory symptoms, such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath, and nasal congestion, that may be associated with exposure to beta glucan.
  • Pulmonary Function Tests: These tests, such as spirometry, measure lung function to assess if there are any impairments or abnormalities in airflow. They can help determine if exposure to beta glucan is impacting lung function.
  • Immunological Assessments: Evaluation of immune responses, such as measuring certain cytokines or inflammatory markers in blood or sputum samples, may be conducted to understand the immunological effects of beta glucan exposure.

It’s important to note that clinical evaluations should be performed by qualified healthcare professionals, such as allergists or pulmonologists, who specialize in diagnosing and managing allergic conditions and respiratory health issues.